Hurricane Florence Resources & Tips

Hurricane Florence damaged the communities where many of Spec On The Job’s North Carolina neighbors live and work.

As people start rebuilding from the storm, I wanted to collect a list of tips and resources – including information on how to donate to those affected by the storm.

 

Protect Yourself From Scams

If you need help with rebuilding work or water mitigation, make sure you use a licensed contractor with verifiable references.

When interviewing contractors, ask about their past experiences with repairing damage from flooding, and about their mold remediation practices.

The state of North Carolina has a Board of Contractors that can give you information on whether or not your contractor is licensed.

Also, be wary of people posing as federal employees, insurance agents, or housing inspectors. Ask for appropriate ID, and don’t give out information like social security numbers, bank accounts, or registration numbers.

 

 

Donating To People In Need

Here are some tips for donating to victims of Hurricane Florence:

  • Donating money is almost always the most efficient way to help after any disaster. Otherwise, valuable time can be lost sorting through donated goods that might not serve people’s immediate needs.

 

  • Donate to established relief groups. You can check a relief organization’s charity report through the BBB Wise Giving Alliance.

 

  • If you’re interested in a relief effort based in Spec On The Job’s home state of North Carolina, Michael Jordan – who owns the Charlotte Hornets and grew up in Wilmington, NC – has set up a relief site. Says Jordan: “The recovery effort will be massive, and it will take a long time to repair the damage and for families to get back on their feet. Together with the NBA, we have launched a platform to aid those most impacted. Please join me, the Hornets organization and the NBA and donate to one of the local organizations assisting in the relief and recovery efforts.”

 

 

Donating To Pets In Need

Animals suffer during natural disasters, too. Shelters for evacuees don’t always allow people to bring pets with them. And animal shelters in the path of a storm have to rush to get as many animals adopted as they can to get them out of harm’s way.

The Carteret County Humane Society in Newport, NC flooded during Hurricane Florence. Their animals have been placed with other rescue groups and foster homes, but the organization still needs volunteers and donations.

The Pender County Animal Shelter – also needs help. The law requires the shelter to euthanize animals if the number of animals coming in exceeds the space it has to hold them, and if suitable relocation options can’t be found. The shelter needs donations to prevent this from happening. It’s asking people to mail monetary donations, pet food, kennels and other supplies. The Pender County Animal Shelter’s mailing address is:
3280 New Savannah Road, Burgaw, NC 28425.

 

Mold Mitigation Tips

The state of North Carolina doesn’t regulate mold remediation licensing. So it’s especially important to check references before hiring a mold remediation company.

Before hiring a remediation company, check with the Restoration Industry Association. The group provides training, certifications, and guidance for water damage restoration contractors.

Air purifier company Molekule has the following tips for homeowners whose homes were affected by water damage during Florence:

  • When your home is safe to enter, dry it out as quickly as possible to minimize mold.

 

  • A remediation specialist should check and clean your HVAC system before it’s turned on. If the HVAC system was flooded, turning it on can spread mold throughout the house.

 

  • To protect yourself, wear an N-95 or N-100 mask. An ordinary dust mask will not protect you from mold.

 

 

 

 

About the Author: Brinna Deavellar is a staffing and marketing professional at Spec On The Job. To send Spec a message or to get daily updates on the latest jobs, follow us on Facebook.

 

 


Sources: NPR.org, NY Times, Molekule.com, The News & Observer, U.S Public Interest Research Group